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CLOUD COMPUTING

INTRODUCTION


In 2011, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defined cloud computing as a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.


Cloud computing is the delivery of computing services that can include servers, storage, databases, networking, software, analytics, and intelligence over the Internet to offer faster innovation and flexible resources.




Instead of buying, owning, and maintaining physical data centers and servers, you can access technology services, such as computing power, storage, and databases, on an as-needed basis from a cloud provider like Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP). So in cloud computing, you can access data from a remote server.

Virtualization and Cloud Computing

The main enabling technology for Cloud Computing is Virtualization. Virtualization is a partitioning of single physical server into multiple logical servers. Once the physical server is divided, each logical server behaves like a physical server and can run an operating system and applications independently. Many popular companies’s like VMware and Microsoft provide virtualization services, where instead of using your personal PC for storage and computation, you use their virtual server. They are fast, cost-effective and less time consuming.

For software developers and testers virtualization comes very handy, as it allows developer to write code that runs in many different environments and more importantly to test that code.

Virtualization is mainly used for three main purposes:

1) Network Virtualization

2) Server Virtualization

3) Storage Virtualization


Network Virtualization: It is a method of combining the available resources in a network by splitting up the available bandwidth into channels, each of which is independent from the others and each channel is independent of others and can be assigned to a specific server or device in real time.


Storage Virtualization: It is the pooling of physical storage from multiple network storage devices into what appears to be a single storage device that is managed from a central console. Storage virtualization is commonly used in storage area networks (SANs).


Server Virtualization: Server virtualization is the masking of server resources like processors, RAM, operating system etc, from server users. The intention of server virtualization is to increase the resource sharing and reduce the burden and complexity of computation from users.


Virtualization is the key to unlock the Cloud system, what makes virtualization so important for the cloud is that it decouples the software from the hardware. For example, PC’s can use virtual memory to borrow extra memory from the hard disk. Usually hard disk has a lot more space than memory. Although virtual disks are slower than real memory, if managed properly the substitution works perfectly. Likewise, there is software which can imitate an entire computer, which means 1 computer can perform the functions equals to 20 computers.


CLOUD COMPUTING DEPLOYMENT MODELS

Cloud deployment models indicate how the cloud services are made available to users. The four deployment models associated with cloud computing are as follows:

1. Public cloud As the name suggests, this type of cloud deployment model supports all users who want to make use of a computing resource, such as hardware (OS, CPU, memory, storage) or software (application server, database) on a subscription basis. Most common uses of public clouds are for application development and testing, non-mission-critical tasks such as file-sharing, and e-mail service.

2. Private cloud: A private cloud is typically infrastructure used by a single organization. Such infrastructure may be managed by the organization itself to support various user groups, or it could be managed by a service provider that takes care of it either on-site or off-site. Private clouds are more expensive than public clouds due to the capital expenditure involved in acquiring and maintaining them. However, private clouds are better able to address the security and privacy concerns of organizations today.

3. Hybrid cloud In a hybrid cloud, an organization makes use of interconnected private and public cloud infrastructure. Many organizations make use of this model when they need to scale up their IT infrastructure rapidly, such as when leveraging public clouds to supplement the capacity available within a private cloud. For example, if an online retailer needs more computing resources to run its Web applications during the holiday season it may attain those resources via public clouds.

4. Community cloud This deployment model supports multiple organizations sharing computing resources that are part of a community; examples include universities cooperating in certain areas of research, or police departments within a county or state sharing computing resources. Access to a community cloud environment is typically restricted to the members of the community.


Author: Tushar Pahuja

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